Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible

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Matthew Henry
Commentary on the Whole Bible (1721)


First Timothy
Completed by BENJAMIN ANDREWS ATKINSON.

 
  • Chapter 1
  • Chapter 2
  • Chapter 3
  • Chapter 4
  • Chapter 5
  • Chapter 6


  • AN

    EXPOSITION,

    W I T H   P R A C T I C A L   O B S E R V A T I O N S,

    OF THE FIRST EPISTLE OF ST. PAUL TO

    T I M O T H Y.


          HITHERTO Paul's epistles were directed to churches; now follow some to particular persons: two to Timothy, one to Titus, and another to Philemon--all three ministers. Timothy and Titus were evangelists, an inferior order to the apostles, as appears by Eph. iv. 11, Some prophets, some apostles, some evangelists. Their commission and work was much the same with that of the apostles, to plant churches, and water the churches that were planted; and accordingly they were itinerants, as we find Timothy was. Timothy was first converted by Paul, and therefore he calls him his own son in the faith: we read of his conversion, Acts xvi. 3.

          The scope of these two epistles is to direct Timothy how to discharge his duty as an evangelist at Ephesus, where he now was, and where Paul ordered him for some time to reside, to perfect the good work which he had begun there. As for the ordinary pastoral charge of that church, he had very solemnly committed it to the presbytery, as appears from Acts xx. 28, where he charges the presbyters to feed the flock of God, which he had purchased with his own blood.


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    Matthew Henry
    Commentary on the Whole Bible (1721)

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    The Greatest Life
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    He was born in an obscure village, the child of a peasant woman. He grew up in still another village where he worked in a carpenter shop until he was thirty. Then for three years he was an itinerant preacher. He never wrote a book. He never held an office. He never had a family or owned a house. He didn't go to college. He never visited a big city. He never traveled more than two hundred miles from the place he was born. He did none of these things that one usually associated with greatness. He had no credentials but himself.

    He was only thirty-three when the tide of public opinion turned against him. His friends ran away. He was turned over to his enemies and went through the mockery of a trial. He was nailed to a cross between two thieves. While he was dying, his executioners gambled for his clothing, the only property he had on earth. When he was dead, he was laid in a borrowed grave through the pity of a friend. Nineteen centuries have come and gone, and today he is the central figure of the human race and the leader of mankind's progress.

    ALL the armies that have ever marched, all the navies that have ever sailed, all the parliaments that have ever sat, all the kings that have ever reigned, put together, have not effected the life of man on the earth as that one solitary man.

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