Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible


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Matthew Henry
Commentary on the Whole Bible (1706)


Numbers

  • Chapter 1
  • Chapter 2
  • Chapter 3
  • Chapter 4
  • Chapter 5
  • Chapter 6
  • Chapter 7
  • Chapter 8
  • Chapter 9
  • Chapter 10
  • Chapter 11
  • Chapter 12
  • Chapter 13
  • Chapter 14
  • Chapter 15
  • Chapter 16
  • Chapter 17
  • Chapter 18
  • Chapter 19
  • Chapter 20
  • Chapter 21
  • Chapter 22
  • Chapter 23
  • Chapter 24
  • Chapter 25
  • Chapter 26
  • Chapter 27
  • Chapter 28
  • Chapter 29
  • Chapter 30
  • Chapter 31
  • Chapter 32
  • Chapter 33
  • Chapter 34
  • Chapter 35
  • Chapter 36

  • AN

    EXPOSITION,

    W I T H   P R A C T I C A L   O B S E R V A T I O N S,

    OF THE FOURTH BOOK OF MOSES, CALLED

    N U M B E R S.


          THE titles of the five books of Moses, which we use in our Bibles, are all borrowed from the Greek translation of the Seventy, the most ancient version of the Old Testament that we know of. But the title of this book only we turn into English; in all the rest we retain the Greek word itself, for which difference I know no reason but that the Latin translators have generally done the same. Otherwise this book might as well have been called Arithmoi, the Greek title, as the first Genesis, and the second Exodus; or these might as well have been translated, and called, the first the Generation, or Original, the second the Out-let, or Escape, as this Numbers.--This book was thus entitled because of the numbers of the children of Israel, so often mentioned in this book, and so well worthy to give a title to it, because it was the remarkable accomplishment of God's promise to Abraham that his seed should be as the stars of heaven for multitude. It also relates to two numberings of them, one at mount Sinai (ch. i.), the other in the plains of Moab, thirty-nine years after, ch. xxvi. And not three men the same in the last account that were in the first. The book is almost equally divided between histories and laws, intermixed.

          We have here, I. The histories of the numbering and marshalling of the tribes (ch. i.-iv.), the dedication of the altar and Levites (ch. vii. viii.), their march (ch. ix. x.), their murmuring and unbelief, for which they were sentenced to wander forty years in the wilderness (ch. xi.-xiv.), the rebellion of Korah (ch. xvi. xvii.), the history of the last year of the forty (ch. xx.-xxvi.), the conquest of Midian, and the settlement of the two tribes (ch. xxxi. xxxii.), with an account of their journeys, ch. xxxiii. II. Divers laws about the Nazarites, &c. (ch. v. vi.); and again about the priests' charge, &c. (ch. xviii. xix.), feasts (ch. xxviii. xxix.), and vows (ch. xxx.), and relating to their settlement in Canaan, ch. xxvii. xxxiv. xxxv. xxxvi.. An abstract of much of this book we have in a few words in Ps. xcv. 10, Forty years long was I grieved with this generation; and an application of it to ourselves in Heb. iv. 1, Let us fear lest we seem to come short. Many considerable nations there were now in being, that dwelt in cities and fortified towns, of which no notice is taken, no account kept, by the sacred history: but very exact records are kept of the affairs of a handful of people, that dwelt in tents, and wandered strangely in a wilderness, because they were the children of the covenant. For the Lord's portion is his people, Jacob is the lot of his inheritance.


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    Matthew Henry
    Commentary on the Whole Bible (1706)

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    The Greatest Life
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    He was born in an obscure village, the child of a peasant woman. He grew up in still another village where he worked in a carpenter shop until he was thirty. Then for three years he was an itinerant preacher. He never wrote a book. He never held an office. He never had a family or owned a house. He didn't go to college. He never visited a big city. He never traveled more than two hundred miles from the place he was born. He did none of these things that one usually associated with greatness. He had no credentials but himself.

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     Where I am today, the Pacific Northwest is ablaze with wildfires in every direction. People in Oregon, California, and Washington are evacuating their homes and seeking refuge in cities. Ash is literally raining from the sky, and there are air quality alerts warning people to stay indoors and out of the smoke. 24 people have already died as the fires are wreaking havoc on whole communities. The Bible describes our tongues in the same way—able to wreak havoc and full of death:

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